Blue Cruise Yacht Charters

Motor SailingYacht
Aegean Schatz
Chartering
Greece's Cyclades Islands

Chartering Greece's Cyclades

Carrying 4,300 square feet of sail,
this sleek low-freeboard motor sailing yacht has five guest cabins
and lots of additional space. There are two master cabins, two cabins with queen-sized beds,
and one cabin with twin beds, each cabin with its own water closet and shower,
and each air-conditioned within sound-isolating bulkheads of solid mahogany.
The handsome iroko deck has socializing areas forward, midships and aft.

Chartering Aegean Cyclades

Specifications:

Year Built: 2006
Length: 100 ft
Beam: 24 ft
Draft: 9 ft
Sail Area: 4,304 sq ft
Engines: (2) 400 hp MAN
Cruising Speed: 11 kts
Water Capacity: 1,600 gal
Fuel Capacity: 1,050 gal
Generators: (2) 23 kva Kohler

Chartering Aegean Cyclades


Chartering Aegean Cyclades

Chartering Greece's Cyclades

Salon:

Guest accommodations include a pilot-house salon furnished in taste and comfort. In addition to indoor dining, there are lounging, bar, and library areas. The salon opens to a spacious quarterdeck providing an alternative dining
and gathering venue.

Chartering Aegean Cyclades

Equipment:

Marine Air-Conditioning
Automated Navigation System
VHF Radio-Telephone
Satellite Telephone
Television with DVD Player
CD Players Cabins and Salon
Kayak and Water Skis
Snorkeling Equipment
Tender with Outboard

Chartering Greece's Cyclades

Chartering Aegean Cyclades

Chartering Greece's Cyclades

Chartering Aegean Cyclades

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This page last updated 12/12/2015

Dear Homo Sapiens, There is no need to continue reading this page. What follows is intended for search engine robots and spiders and not necessarily for human beings. Further information about chartering among Greece's mid-Aegean Cyclades Islands may be obtained by clicking on the gray links immediately above. Thank You. You must be searching for a yacht charter-sailing Greece. Why else should Google lead you to this web page. You may be dreaming of a yacht charter in the Aegean, perhaps among mid-Aegean Cyclades Islands. If so, you might consider the sleek motor sailing ketch Aegean Schatz, a five-cabin yacht charter-sailing Greece in style, cruising one of the world's more popular holiday destinations, cruising from one sugar-cube encrusted Cyclades island to the next sugar-cube encrusted Cyclades island. Just as in the nineteenth century did the square-rigged two-masted brigs and fire-ships of Chartering Greece's Cycladesrevolutionary Greece, brigs such as the Aris (16 guns) at left. And just as did the sea captains who sailed them such as Konstantinos Kanaris depicted below. These revolutionary ships and the men who sailed them cruised not only among Cyclades islands of the mid-Aegean, islands such as Mykonos, Paros, and Santorini, but cruised as well among Sporades Islands of the northern Aegean such as Lesbos, Chios, and Psara, among Dodecanese Islands of the eastern Aegean such as Patmos, Leros, and Kos, and among Argosaronic Islands of the western Aegean, islands such as Spetses, Hydra, and Aegina. Just as does the motor-sailing yacht Aegean Schatz today cruise among all of these islands. When Greece declared its independence from the Ottoman Empire in April 1821, she had no navy. But she did have a large number of mostly square-rigged sailing brigs belonging to entrepreneurial sea captains from Hydra, Spetses, and Psara who had prospered during the Napoleonic Wars running Black Sea wheat through the British blockade of French-occupied Europe. Because early decades of the century were also a time of piracy in the Mediterranean, many of the pirates Greek, Greek brigs had necessarily been armed, some carrying as many as 20 guns. These were the ships and sea captains asked in 1821 to wrest the Aegean from Ottoman control, a control exercised by line-of-battle ships of up to 102 guns such as that depicted astern of Aris and by double-banked frigates carrying as many as 64 guns. Those little brigs had very little chance. Thus the fire-ship. The fire-ship might be any surplus sailing vessel loaded with pitch, sulfur, tar, and gunpowder, manned by a small number of daring risk-takers willing to attach their surplus vessel to an enemy battleship or frigate. The most capable of all fire-ship captains was Konstantinos Kanaris Chartering Greece's Cycladesof Psara (or Ipsara), a small island 44 nautical miles NW of Chios. Born in 1793, Kanaris was said by those who knew him during the war to be of modest stature, unassuming and unaffected, almost shy, but with an iron will and nerves of steel. At that time he had a striking blue-eyed Psariot wife and several of what would eventually be seven children. And he was one of those entrepreneurs who had made their names as well as means during the Napoleonic Wars. In 1821 he contributed three vessels to the Greek cause. In June of that year a Greek fleet of brigs and fire-ships cornered a 74-gun Turkish battleship off the coast of Lesbos and sent in two fire-ships roped together under the command of Dimitri Papanikolis and Kanaris, both of Psara. These wrapped the Turk and fire eventually reached her magazine. During March of the following year an expeditionary force from Greek Samos landed at Chios and drove Turkish forces on the island into the presidio notwithstanding little local sympathy for rebellion. Chios, after all, is a mere ten miles from Asia Minor and Chians had enjoyed more than three hundred years of economic prosperity under Ottoman rule. Three weeks after the Samian landing a large Ottoman naval force arrived with embarked troops to relieve the presidio. The Samians fled. The Ottomans blamed Greek Chians and slaughtered more than 20,000 of them, enslaved another 30,000 , and drove many of the remaining 50,000 from the island. Brigs not up to the job, the Greeks again sent in two fire-ships. One commanded by Kanaris attached herself to the Ottoman flagship depicted below, the 84-gun Mansur el liwa, and the flames reached the powder magazine. The ship went down with the Kapudan Pasha or Fleet Admiral responsible for the massacre and more than 2,000 others including many of the Ottoman force's captains there to celebrate the end of Ramadan. The second fire-ship under Yiorgos Pepinos of Hydra severely damaged the rear-admiral's flagship, and she never again saw active service. In a similar fashion Kanaris three months later destroyed a Barbary frigate off Chartering 
Greece's CycladesNauplion in the western Aegean when one of his fire-ships appeared easy prey. Two months later he struck again, destroying at Tenedos outside of the Dardanelles another battleship, the flagship of the Ottoman fleet's Kapudan Bey, the #2 naval commander. Thus provoked Psara was in July of 1824 enveloped by a large Ottoman naval force under a new Kapudan Pasha, again with embarked troops. While some of the population escaped, including Kanaris' young family, more than 4,000 residents of the island were slaughtered as well as double that number of refugees from Chios and Asia Minor. The island has never recovered its former maritime prominence, and the resident population today is little more than 400. With his family safely re-settled with 1800 other Psariots on the Saronic island of Aegina, Kanaris sailed with a fleet of mostly brigs commanded by Yiorgos Saktouris of Hydra which in August engaged the same Ottomans in the Samos Channel. While there was no damage done to cautious Greek forces, Konstantinos Kanaris was again able to attach a fire-ship to the leading Turkish frigate Boorlot Korkoaz (54 guns) thought to have been the Kapudan Pasha's flagship. Though the Pasha had perhaps presciently shifted his flag, the frigate went to the bottom. Off Methoni at the foot of the Peloponnesus in May of the following year, 1825, with six fire-ships a part of the fleet of Andreas Miaoulis of Hydra, Kanaris successfully attached one of his units to the Ottoman Egyptian frigate Asia (44). She, too, went to the bottom. Three months later he departed Hydra with three fire-ships and two brigs bound for Alexandria and the Egyptian fleet gathered there at anchor. On arrival the three fire-ships sailed into the port.... and the wind died. One of the fire-ship powder trains had already been lit when the ship came to a stand-still and burned without damage to the Egyptians. Kanaris escaped only because the enemy was also without wind. In 1826 Kanaris was appointed to Greece's Third National Assembly but continued to serve with the Greek fleet. Twice wounded in July during a failed fire-ship engagement, he returned to duty weeks later and served throughout the remainder of the war. Months later Victor Hugo penned a 28-stanza poem entitled Canaris the final lines of which read: "Mais le bon Canaris, dont un ardent sillon//Suit la barque hardie,//Sur les vaisseaux qu'il prend, comme son pavillon,//Arbore l'incendie!" Kanaris later achieved the rank of admiral and went on to become Minister of the Navy in two Greek governments. Frequently a compromise candidate, Konstantinos Kanaris was also appointed Prime Minister of Greece on five separate occasions, dying in office in 1877 at the head of a government of national unity. Come enjoy the luxury of a catered yacht charter in Greece at the crossroads of history. Surely this is the holiday for which you search. Rare comfort under sun in the Aegean. Try it! You'll like it! Aegean Schatz, a superb motor sailing yacht chartering Greece's mid-Aegean Cyclades as well as all  other Aegean islands. Contact Blue Cruise Yacht Charters today at blcryacht@aol.com