Blue Cruise Yacht Charters

Dufour 445GL
Bareboat Sailing
Greek And Turkish
Aegean

Bareboat Greek Aegean

The Dufour 445GL's stately lines and graceful plumb-bowed exterior
are a tribute to naval architect Umberto Felci and the Dufour Yachts Design Team. Her thoroughbred speed and steady trim mean that even in a good wind it is possible to leave driving to the autopilot. Console mounted engine controls and instrumentation are within easy reach of the twin helms, while rigid boom-vang, in-mast furling main, reefing genoa, and retracting sprit are further evidence of the quest for
simplified bareboat sailing in the Greek and Turkish Aegean.

Bareboat Turkish Aegean

Bareboat Greek Aegean

Technical Specifications:

L.O.A.: 44.2 ft
W.L.L.: 39.1 ft
Beam: 14.2 ft
Draft: 7.2 ft
Displacement: 22,720 lbs
Sail Area: 1,060 sq ft (genoa)
Engine: 75 hp Volvo
Water Tanks: 125 gal
Fuel Tanks: 65 gal

Equipment:

Furling Main & Furling Headsail
Autopilot
GPS Plotter
Bimini Top
Bow Thruster & Electric Windlass
VHF Radio & CD Stereo Music System
Cockpit Speakers
Fully Equipped Galley
Dingy w/Outboard

Bareboat Greek Aegean

Bareboat Turkish Aegean

Bareboat Greek Aegean

With increased comfort in mind,
Dufour445GL designers have concentrated on creating an inviting living area. This can be seen in light and airy below-decks spaces with eight deck hatches and eight ports as well as recessed courtesy lighting, all brightening moabi mahogany paneling and laminated moabi floorboards. The sizeable dinette is the feature of a salon with settee capable of accommodating eight persons. The fully-equipped galley has ample provision for stowage on several levels and a refrigerator tailored to the needs of charter guests. There are twin queen-bunked cabins forward and aft sharing two water closets. Dufour445GL bareboat sailing in the Greek and Turkish Aegean affords an extraordinary degree of comfort enhancing any cruising holiday.

Bareboat Turkish Aegean

Bareboat Greek Aegean

A Smaller Bareboat Sailing
The Greek And Turkish Aegean


A Larger Bareboat Sailing
The Greek And Turkish Aegean


A Crewed Yacht Sailing
The Greek And Turkish Aegean


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This page last updated 11/14/2016

Bareboat Turkish Aegean

Dear Homo Sapiens, There is no need to continue reading this page. What follows is intended for search engine robots and spiders and not necessarily for human beings. Further information concerning bareboat sailing in the Greek and Turkish Aegean may be obtained by clicking on the gray links immediately above. Thank You. You must be searching for a bareboat sailing the Greek and Turkish Aegean. Or for transport between remote Aegean islands of Greece. Or for a yacht aboard which to cruise the pine-clad cove-indented coasts of Turkey's ancient Caria and ancient Lycia. Or for Dufour Yachts, the La Rochelle, France, manufacturer of Dufour yachts such as the 445 Grand Large. There would seem no other reason for your visit to this web page. It is quite likely, then, you are dreaming of a holiday sailing the Greek or Turkish Aegean or both, perhaps aboard a Dufour bareboat. We hope so because that's what this web page is all about. Should you be here for some other reason, why not take a look at the Dufour 445GL anyway, you know, for your next holiday. The Dufour 445GL sails the crossroads of history at the cradle of civilization. She does so on azure and turquoise sea stretching between white sand beaches bordering ancient seaports harboring the evidence of history's passage. She does so cruising between remote island anchorages and caique harbors at the foot of bougainvillea-draped slopes leading to one or another acropolis or castle or fortress, Greek, Turkish, Genovese, or Venetian, often surrounded by the mighty bulwarks of the Hospitaller Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, all of which have a history to relate. At Bodrum on the Turkish Riviera, Halicarnassus in antiquity, bareboat visitors may sit in the oldest theater in Anatolia (Greek east) looking down over the Castle of Saint Peter built by Hospitaller Knights in the XVth century partly from tumbled blocks of one of the seven wonders of the Ancient World. And while seated in the theater bareboaters may enjoy musical entertainment not too different than enjoyed in the same theater 2300 years earlier. Ten miles to the south of the theater then and now looms the Greek island of Kos, birthplace of Hippocrates as well as of one of Cleopatra's Macedonian forebears. Bodrum, Kos, and ancient Knidos another fifteen Bareboat Greek Aegeanmiles to the south each hosted the Egyptian queen in 32 BC. Knidos 333 years earlier took delivery of one of the two most famous marble statues in history, Praxiteles' nude Aphrodite, doing so only because Kos in its modesty insisted on a draped Aphrodite. There you have twenty-five miles in one direction, and there are 32 points to the compass each stretching hundreds of miles along the crossroads of history. Are you wondering about the black-and-white print depicted at left? That's a Mediterranean galley in the foreground, the lateen-rigged vessel flying a fleur-de-lis at the stern. While it appears quite small when contrasted with the three-masted sailing carrack beyond, this early XVIth century French galley, said to be Le Chevalier, was 164-feet in length with twenty-five 3-man oars to a side. She mounted five guns at the bow, one a ship-sinking bronze basilisk able to put a 100-lb shot through any ship's planking. The carrack being boarded by galley crewmen is flying England's St George's Cross atop the foremast and perhaps the Tudor banner astern. Said with artistic license to be the Mary Rose, flagship of Lord High Admiral Sir Edward Howard, she was of a similar length on deck, displaced 500 tons, and mounted 78 guns none as powerful as a bronze basilisk. So, would you be interested in a bareboat charter along the the crossroads of history? A crossroads populated by ancient galleys as well as by late-medieval galleys and carracks? Would you not like to sail from one quaint seaside town with bazaar to another quaint seaside town with bazaar, both looking down on ancient seaports? Or are you dreaming of a bareboat charter sailing from one snow-white blue-shuttered island town nourishing potted geraniums to the next snow-white blue-shuttered town supporting trellised grapevines? How about realizing your dream aboard a charter yacht with accommodations for eight. Room for you two and three like-minded couples. Or for your extended family. How about chartering a bareboat sailing yacht to cruise Turkey's ancient Lycia from Gocek, ancient Lycia with its white sand beaches below stark mountain backdrops. Or to sail Pregent de Bidoux's routes along the coasts of Lycia and neighboring Caria and among Greek Aegean islands. While you enjoy those bazaars and potted geraniums. Surely you would like to holiday aboard a bareboat charter yacht proceeding leisurely from one enchanting locale to another, both selected by you. Who wouldn't? One who wouldn't was the aforementioned Pregent de Bidoux who in 1513 and 1514 flew his flag aboard Le Chevalier. Pregent de Bidoux was born a Gascon in 1468 or thereabouts near Tarbes in the Hautes-Pyrenees department of south-western France. Offspring of minor nobility but not the eldest son, it does not appear he ever had a holiday. Destined from birth for the cloth, he was accepted into the Hospitaller's monastic Order in his mid-teens, then swearing eternal abstinence and chastity. He arrived at the Hospitaller island of Rhodes shortly after Ottoman Sultan Mehmet's unsuccessful 1480 siege of Rhodes Town, and like all Hospitallers was soon laboring in the Order's hospital. Said to be the finest in the world, the hospital at Rhodes tended in immaculate cleanliness the sick and wounded at a time of epidemic disease and continual war. All Hospitallers also served at sea and Bidoux was no exception, by the age of 20 rising to command of one of the Order's red-hulled black-prowed galleys then the scourge of Aegean corsairs. Of which there were many including the four Barbarossa brothers, four Kurtoglu brothers, and the two Dragut brothers, the Barbarossas and Draguts to be related by marriage of offspring. By 1486 Bidoux commanded the Hospitaller galley squadron then numbering four. Two more years later he was summoned back to France by King Charles VIII. Enjoying the complete confidence of France's young king, Bidoux even then had ready access at court. In 1495 King Charles made Bidoux the first commander of France's new Levantine Galley Squadron. He subsequently fought in the Italian wars commanding fleets of up to sixty ships, fought at the 1499 Battle of Zonchio between the Ottomans on one hand and Venice supported by France and the Hospitallers on the other, and with his share of prize money constructed and equipped his own galley squadron which in 1500 and 1501 he based at Ermoupolis, Syros, in the Aegean Cyclades, moving to Rhodes Town a year later. Have you a week to read on? Or a year? Of Bareboat Greek Aegeancourse not. We should note in conclusion, however, that in a war with England all about ownership of his own Gascony, Pregent de Bidoux proved victorious when in 1513 and 1514 he took the Levantine Galley Squadron north to the English Channel and engaged the Mary Rose and others. The English lost their Lord High Admiral if not his flagship. Again in Hospitaller service, Bidoux in 1521 brought the new Grand Master Philippe Villiers de l'Isle-Adam from Marseilles to Rhodes aboard the Hospitaller's own great carrack Santa Maria depicted to the right. He did so only by eluding Muslihiddin Kurtoglu and a fleet numbering 75 galleys and galliots, Kurtoglu seeking to avenge the death of two of his brothers and imprisonment of the third by the Hospitallers. Bidoux remained at Rhodes the following year for Sultan Suleiman's successful six-month siege. On New Year's Day 1523 he and 159 other surviving knights marched out under raised banners wearing full armor and scarlet surcoats emblazoned with the Order's white cross, many of the knights including Bidoux wounded, and it was to them the sultan bowed his head in admiration. The French historian Charles de la Ronciere described Pregent de Bidoux as "a man of such great courage, of wisdom so rare, of generosity so full, of honor so enormous, of integrity so lovable, of belief so certain, of boldness so unparalleled that each of his virtues could be said to be complete and perfect." Come join us at the crossroads of history. Come join us in Bodrum or Kos or Rhodes or Gocek on the border between ancient Caria and ancient Lycia. Are you searching for Gocek in Turkey? Well, it is in the NW corner of the large Turkish gulf 42 nautical miles ENE of Rhodes Town, just where Pregent de Bidoux found it, and 15 road miles from its own international airport at Dalaman. There we can put you aboard a bareboat for the holiday Pregent de Bidoux never had. We can put you aboard a Dufour 445GL and point you toward the flat sailing waters of the Gulfs of Gocek and Fethiye, show you Alexander's Path down the coast of Lycia, show you Cleopatra's Route up the coast of Caria and among Greek islands, and show you Pregent de Bidoux's many tracks through the Greek and Turkish Aegean. Contact Blue Cruise Yacht Charters today at blcryacht@aol.com