Hanse 575 Skippered Charters Cruising Turkey, Greece, and Croatia

Blue Cruise Yacht Charters

Skippered
Hanse 575
Charters
Croatia, Greece And Turkey

Skippered Charters Greece

This distinctive charter yacht cruising Turkey, Greece, and Croatia
is a 56-foot six berth sloop built on the Baltic coast of Germany. She is distinguished by an extraordinarily large cockpit and an awful lot of additional deck space. The Hanse 575 features teak decks, fast hull, and and a host of innovations. There is in addition full sun protection including cockpit spray hood and bimini as well as boom mounted awning for all-weather shelter even under sail. Below-decks the Hanse 575 is superbly appointed in contemporary style with large salon, single double-berth cabin forward,
two double-berth cabins aft, plus a crew cabin in the forepeak, all four with ensuite bathroom.
The Hanse 575 above and below deck is indeed a distinctive yacht.

Technical Specifications:

Length Over All: 56 ft
Waterline Length: 50 ft
Beam: 17 ft
Draft: 9 ft
Sail Area: 1,728 sq ft
Displacement: 21.5 tons
Engine: 107 hp Perkins
Cruising Speed: 8 kts
Displacement: 46,500 lbs
Water Tanks: 210 gal
Fuel Tanks: 135 gal

Skippered
    Charters Turkey

Equipment:

Autopilot
Integrated Navigation System
Electric Windlass
VHF Radio
Television
CD Stereo Music System
Cockpit Speakers
12 kva Generator
Windsurfer
Fully Equipped Galley
Tender w/Outboard

Skippered Charters Croatia

Skippered
    Charters Turkey

Skippered
    Charters Greece

The Hanse 575's interior is warm and welcoming.
Bulkheads are an integral part of the hull faced in a variety of attractive paneling, furnishings are carefully crafted, while flooring comes in three attractive options. The forward master cabin is large by yacht standards with queen bed and a plethora of cupboard stowage as well as separate shower and toilet compartments, There are two additional cabins aft with with water closet. The galley and salon are amidships and roomy. The dining table seats eight while the galley is fully equipped with grill and oven as well as refrigerator with ice making capability.

Yacht Charters Greece

Skippered
    Charters Turkey

Skippered
    Charters Greece

Skippered
    Charters Croatia

Skippered Charters Greece

Skippered Charters Turkey

Skippered Charters Croatia

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This page last updated 07/16/2015

Dear Homo Sapiens, There is no need to continue reading this page. What follows is intended for search engine robots and spiders and not necessarily for human beings. Further information concerning skippered yacht charters in Turkey, Greece, and Croatia may be obtained by clicking on the gray links immediately above. Thank You. You may be searching for a skippered yacht charter or you may simply be curious about the word Hanse tickling a vague memory. If the latter, you may be attempting to recall from history studies the Hanseatic League or League of Hanse Towns, a federation of north German free cities including Lubeck and Hamburg. Organized in the thirteenth century, the League promoted and protected commerce between members and internationally, including merchant shipping as depicted at left, the white flag with double-headed eagle that of Lubeck. Another early member of the Hanseatic League was the Pomeranian port of Greifswald situated on the Baltic near the current border with Poland. Greifswald is the Hanse town in which Hanse Yachts has in little more than two decades Skippered Charters Balticbecome the second largest yacht builder in Germany distributing internationally a number of popular yacht models noted for speed, comfort, and innovation. Neither of these purposes being the case, neither skippered yacht charters nor recollection of the Hanseatic League, you may be searching for any yacht cruising Turkey, Greece, and Croatia. Well, we have any yachts, as well, so read on. We also have history. Lots of it. Turkey, Greece, and Croatia sit at the crossroads of history. Each has seen the cultural zenith of antiquity, the passing of empires, and the passing of those who advanced learning and the arts as well as those who created empires. The three countries have also seen the passing of crusades and crusaders, including the Hospitaller Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights of Rhodes and later as the Knights of Malta. Georg Schilling von Cannstatt was one such Hospitaller making history at the crossroads of history. Born to Swabian nobility in 1490 at Neuffen in Baden-Württemberg, he was received into the Order at Rhodes in 1504 at the tender age of fourteen. By 1522 and Ottoman Sultan Suleiman's six-month Siege of Rhodes, Schilling had not only completed his novitiate but was a veteran of two years in the Order's Hospital, the most advanced hospital in the western world. He was also a veteran of more than two years at sea aboard the Order's mighty red-hulled and black-prowed war galleys. He would need every bit of his medical and warrior experience for what turned out to be six months of siege by up to 400 vessels and 200,000 Ottoman soldiers and sappers, Rhodes defended by 500 knights and 4,000 men at arms. Together with fewer than a dozen other German knights led by Christoph Waldner he was assigned to a section of walls on the western edge of the city between the Gate of Saint Anthony and Bastion of Saint George, just beyond the palace in the depiction at right. Exposed to cannon fire from the ancient acropolis, these walls were never breached but most defenders were lost, including Waldner wounded three times before his end. Schilling, though, was one of 160 surviving knights, most walking wounded, to march out of the city on the first day of 1523 to whom Suleiman is said to have doffed his turban. Skippered Yachts RhodesGeorg Schilling's prominence in Hospitaller history, however, was to come not at Rhodes but rather nineteen years later during Holy Roman Emperor Charles V's October 1541 Siege of Algiers. Accompanying Charles V in the royal galley, Andrea Doria advised the emperor to not undertake the siege given an absence of shelter in the Bay of Algiers and seasonal weather conditions on the North African coast. Doria was ignored. Schilling at the time was Captain-General of the Hospitaller galley squadron and commander of embarked infantry, his force a small fraction of the huge Spanish and Italian armada gathered for the occasion. Arriving at Algiers at month-end, a storm for three days prevented all communication with the shore. The landing on the fourth day was perilous and difficult for the major part of the soldiery who entered water up to the neck, Schilling among them leading his 500 embarked personnel ashore. Numerous bands of Bedouin cavalry harassed the landing with close sorties during which imperial infantry was smothered with arquebus fire, with crossbow bolts, and with barbed lances. With three Hospitallers leading each column, imperial ground forces managed nonetheless to soon encircle the city depicted below. Remaining Hospitallers had meanwhile combined with Italian contingents and the lot had been placed under Schilling's command. A violent bombardment of the walls commenced only to have a new and more severe storm rush out of the northwest, one which surprised besiegers who in their haste had not attended to food and shelter. In the rain the imperial camp became a mud bath. All night imperial soldiers were whipped by rain and icy wind, incapable of using their arquebusses because of sodden powder. Moors and Turks under the city's Ottoman governor carried out a dawn sortie driving all before them. The situation was barely salvaged by Hospitallers who covered withdrawal of imperial forces. At the same time the storm had forced 150 ships to pull anchors and to be blown on the rocks or overturned on the beach. Bedouins waited in ambush on the beach to capture, kill, and strip those able to reach the shore and to plunder all Skippered Yachts Algiersthat was possible from beached ships. Doria's royal galley and others including the Hospitaller squadron held to the sea with difficulty, finally taking shelter beyond the eastern cape of the Bay of Algiers. There exhausted survivors were re-embarked while Hospitallers provided the rear guard defending against Bedouin cavalry. Furious clashes were constant. The wounded who fell were slaughtered by the enemy. The Knights of the Order of Jerusalem paid a high penalty at a place near the bridge of Fursi which, because of Hospitaller losses, is still called "Tomb of the Knights." In the end more than 8,000 imperial troops were lost together with more than 200 warships. Georg Schilling, however, returned to Malta with his galley squadron intact if with his ground force decimated. A grateful Charles V was to later make Georg Schilling von Cannstatt a Prince of the Holy Roman Empire. Well, in Turkey or Greece or Croatia we can put you aboard a skippered Hanse 575 for the holiday of a lifetime. We can put you aboard a charter yacht with an experienced captain able to show you Georg Schilling's tracks from Rhodes down the coast of Turkey, able to show you his routes among Aegean islands of Greece, or able to show you the Adriatic coast and islands of Croatia. The Hanse 575, a superb charter yacht sailing Turkey, Greece, and Croatia. Contact us today at blcryacht@aol.com