Blue Cruise Yacht Charters

Jeanneau 57 Crewed Yachts
Charter Sailing The
Greek And Turkish
Aegean

Sailing Turkish Aegean

The stately lines and graceful exterior
of the Jeanneau 57 enclose a wealth of interior space, while her easy helm, thoroughbred speed, and steady trim mean that even in stiff wind it is possible to leave driving to the autopilot. With increased comfort in mind, Jeanneau's designers have concentrated on creating an inviting living area with leather upholstery and blond teak flooring lighted by yards of windows and overhead hatches. There are twin convertible cabins forward and aft sharing four water closets plus a crew berth in the forepeak. The Jeanneau 57 sailing the Greek and Turkish Aegean offers an extraordinary degree of comfort enhancing any charter outing.

Sailing Greek Aegean

Technical Specifications:

Length: 58 ft 3 in
Beam: 16 ft 4 in
Draft: 8 ft 2 in
Sail Area: 1,572 sq ft
Engine: 140 hp VW
Displacement: 47,190 lbs
Water Tanks: 246 gal
Fuel Tanks: 111 gal

Equipment:

Furling Headsail
Furling Main
Autopilot, GPS
Bimini Top
Electric Windlass
VHF Radio-Telephone
CD Stereo Music System
Fully Equipped Galley
Deep Freeze
Marine Air Conditioning
Dingy w/Outboard

Sailing Greek Aegean

Sailing Turkish Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean Sailing Turkish Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

Sailing Turkish Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

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This page last updated 01/17/2016

Sailing Turkish Aegean

Dear Homo Sapiens, There is no need to continue reading this page. What follows is intended for search engine robots and spiders and not necessarily for human beings. Further information concerning crewed yachts charter sailing the Greek and Turkish Aegean may be obtained by clicking on the gray links immediately above. Thank You. Given the title of this web page, you must be searching for a crewed yacht charter sailing the Greek or Turkish Aegean. You may be dreaming of a crewed yacht charter along white sand beaches turning into pine-encircled coves punctuating Turkey's Turquoise Coast, a coast coinciding with that of ancient Lycia from whence came so many of Homer's Trojan heroes, and from whence also came so many of the Sea People shedding light on the Dark Ages between Troy and Homer. Or you may imagine yourself wafted over an azure sea by a gentle breeze from one remote under-populated Greek island to the next, islands once dominated by the Minoan empire of Minos, and before and after Minos by Carians of Asia Minor. The Carian civilization bordered ancient Lycia, and among other Sailing Greek Aegeanremarkable individuals gave us a succession of history-altering queens including two sea commanders. Or you may simply imagine yourself aboard a crewed yacht sailing the crossroads of history, sailing the oared-galley tracks of Achaeans and Trojans, of Phoenicians and Persians, of Athenians and Spartans, and of rogues and corsairs. Sailing from one quaint seaside town with bazaar to another charming seaside town huddled around a safe harbor. Or sailing from one snow-white blue-shuttered island town nourishing potted geraniums to the next snow-white blue-shuttered town supporting miles of bougainvillea. How about turning imagination into reality aboard a crewed charter yacht with group accommodations, room for you two, perhaps a sibling and an in-law, and respective progeny. How about chartering a crewed sailing yacht to fill in the history and geography gaps left by your local school systems. How about chartering a crewed sailing yacht to cruise Turkey's ancient Lycia from Gocek. Or to sail in the oared-galley wake of a Genovese rogue first appearing in the Aegean in 1354 to pirate along shipping lanes linking the Hellespont to the western Mediterranean. But finding piracy insufficiently lucrative, Francesco Gattilusio one year later linked up at the Aegean island of Lemnos with the deposed Byzantine Emperor John V Palaeologus, driven from his throne by John VI Cantacuzenus. In return for reinstalling the deposed emperor on the Byzantine throne Gattilusio asked only for the emperor's sister in marriage and the Aegean island of Lesbos for a fief. In an unremarked chapter in history Francesco Gattilusio became one of only three conquerors of Constantinople. But that's a story too lengthy for this web page. John V was reinstalled and became brother-in-law to a rogue. Greek Orthodox Christians populating Lesbos became minions to a Genovese Roman Catholic installed in the local castle without their approval and with their enforced obeisance. So, too, did residents of Lemnos and mainland Thrace when the lordship expanded. These resident Greeks with their labor made Francesco Gattilusio king of Sailing Turkish Aegeanthe trade in locally produced ouzo and light-weight Venetian gold ducats, much to the distress of Venice. Or how about chartering a crewed charter yacht to sail the oared-galley wake of another Genovese rogue who almost a century earlier in 1267 similarly traded service to then-Emperor Michael VIII Palaeologus for a royal sister and fiefdom at Phocaea on the Anatolian coast near Smyrna, and later expanded that fiefdom to include the Aegean island of Chios. Benedetto Zaccaria and his successors, Lords of Chios and Phocaea, became kings of trade in locally produced alumina and mastic mined and tapped by resident Greek minions. A celebrated Genovese admiral in his other life, that's Benedetto to the right gracing the facade of Genoa's Palazzo San Giorgio. These two Genovese, however, were late plundering the Aegean. All of the remaining islands on our map, including Crete, Melos, Thera (Santorini), and the others north of those three had in 1204 become the realm of Enrico Dandolo, the Doge or Duke of Venice. Dandolo had that year diverted the Fourth Crusade from the Holy Land to the rape and plunder of Christian Constantinople, thereby giving wealth to the city-state of Venice, thereby impoverishing Constantinople, and thereby giving rise to lasting enmity between Roman Catholics and Greek Orthodox Catholics. In the division of Fourth Crusade spoils, Baldwin, Count of Flanders, became ruler from Constantinople of a new Latin empire which survived 57 years until retaken by the Greeks in 1261. But by far the largest share of the spoils, "one quarter and one-half of one quarter," went to Dandolo's Venice, including Crete, Melos, Thera, and the Cyclades islands to the north of those three. The Cyclades were turned over to Dandolo's nephew Marco Sanudo, and he termed them the Duchy of Naxos on which island he ensconced himself. This fief is otherwise known to history as the Duchy of the Archipelago. Marco Sanudo was smart enough to realize he could not hold so many islands against restive inhabitants with his own small group of mercenaries, and for that reason today we find other Venetian names attached to many of them: Marino Dandolo (Andros), Iacopo Barossi (Thera), Leonardo Foscolo (Anafi), Andrea Ghisi (Kea, Mykonos, Serifos, Skiathos, Skopelos, Skyros, and Tinos), and Marco Venier (Kithera). None of their Latin descendants, however, was a 1535 match for the oared galleys of Kheir-ed-Din Barbarossa, himself originally a Greek Orthodox Catholic from Lesbos. All fell to that Ottoman admiral. Sound interesting? Are you even now searching for Gocek in Turkey? Gocek may be found on the map above in the northern corner of that large gulf just to the left of the L in Lycia, 25 minutes by road from its own international airport at Dalaman (DLM). In Gocek we have charter yachts with experienced crews able to show you Barbarossa tracks up, down, and across the Greek and Turkish Aegean, rogue tracks, too. Handsome fun yachts. Contact Blue Cruise Yacht Charters today at blcryacht@aol.com.