Blue Cruise Yacht Charters

Sun Odyssey 469 Yachts
Charter Sailing The
Greek And Turkish
Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

The newest addition to the Sun Odyssey family,
the 469 incorporates the latest innovations and inherits the best characteristics of this popular line of yachts charter sailing the Greek and Turkish Aegean. From the drawing board of Philippe Briand, clean lines and an elongated hull with moderate freeboard give the Sun Odyssey 469 an extraordinary aesthetic value and sailing performance. An interior bathed in light affords the space and comfort found on a 50-foot yacht.
The Sun Odyssey 469 comes in three and four-cabin versions.

Sailing Turkish Aegean

Technical Specifications:

LOA: 46.1 ft
LWL 44.6 ft
Beam: 14.6 ft
Draft: 7.2 ft
Displacement: 23,780 lbs
Sail Area: 1,136 sq ft
Engine: 54 hp Yanmar
Water Tanks: 162 gal
Fuel Tanks: 63 gal

Equipment:

Furling Headsail
Fully-Battened Main
Autopilot, GPS
Bimini Top
Electric Windlass
VHF Radio, CD Stereo System
Fully Equipped Galley
Dingy w/Outboard

Sailing Turkish Aegean

Sailing Turkish Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

Sailing Turkish Aegean

Sailing Turkish Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

Sailing Greek Aegean

A Three-Cabin Gulet Sailing The Greek And Turkish Aegean

A Four-Cabin Catamaran Sailing The Greek And Turkish Aegean

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This page last updated 10/27/2016

Dear Homo Sapiens, There is no need to continue reading this page. What follows is intended for search engine robots and spiders and not necessarily for human beings. Further information concerning yachts charter sailing the Greek and Turkish Aegean may be obtained by clicking on the gray links immediately above. Thank You. You are with little doubt searching for a holiday in the sun, probably for a sailing holiday in the sun, and possibly for a yacht charter-sailing the Greek and Turkish Aegean. The little doubt involves the related possibility you are searching for information concerning Homer's Odyssey, related because the subject of Homer's epic poem did quite a bit of sailing in the Greek and Turkish Aegean both before and after the fall of Troy, and his seven-year sojourn on the Aegean island of Ogygia might well be described as a holiday in the sun. Homer himself is said to have been born on the Aegean island of Chios, and so he knew of what he recounted. Presuming you are searching for and will find a holiday in the Aegean and, as on most holidays, books will be brought along for company, the aforementioned 2800 year-old saga is still available at your favorite book store. Again presuming you are searching for a holiday afloat or ashore, why not make it afloat. Why not have your holiday aboard the latest in the Sun Odyssey line of charter yachts sailing the Greek and Turkish Aegean, sailing the crossroads of history, a crossroads which has seen the passing of empires, Egyptian, Hittite, Lydian, Persian, Athenian, Macedonian, Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman, to exclude near-empires. It is a crossroads which has also seen the passing of the giants of history, those individuals who shaped empires such as Croesus as in As rich as Croesus. He was the first to coin money and he did it at his Lydian capital city of Sardis in Anatolia. There were the all too familiar others, as well, Pericles of Athens, Alexander of Macedon, Sailing Turkish AegeanJulius Caesar and his contemporaries from Rome, Pompeii and Antony, Brutus, too, all cruising our crossroads. And we had pirates and corsairs, as well, the Sea People from Turkey's ancient Lycia (Lykia) and Cilicia (Kilikya) who populated the Dark Ages between the fall of Troy and Homer himself, the Barbarossa brothers of Lesbos at the turn of the 16th century, and a host of others. One of these others was a most mysterious corsair frequenting our shores in the latter half of the 17th century, making trouble for all things Ottoman under the Portuguese flag while finding safe harbor and fresh water for his square-rigged squadron of Maltese corsairs at, among others, now-Greek Ayios Yiorgos and still-Turkish Kekova Roads, both proximate to the Gocek, Turkey, homeport of our 469s. Known simply as le Chevalier Flacourt, he was born Pierre le Bret de Flacourt in about 1643, the year Louis XIV became King of France under the regency of his mother. Pierre le Bret was the second son of Julien le Bret de Flacourt and grandson of Cardin le Bret, a prominent jurist who expounded in 1632's De la Souverainete du Roy and otherwise the doctrine of divine god-given right of royalty to succeed one another on the basis of blood-line alone. Cardin expounded so well that he became a fast friend of Cardinal Richelieu, Louis XIII's minister of everything, was made a state councilor, and had a meteoric rise from bourgeoisie to nobility. Made Lord of Flacourt, his new social status propelled his only son Julien and elder grandson Pierre-Cardin to the same position of state councilor under Louis XIV. This new social status, nobility, further enabled his second grandson to obtain entry in 1661 to the religious Order of the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem then at Malta. Following a year of novitiate, Pierre le Bret was knighted the following August by Hospitaller Grand Master Raphael Cotoner. He was knighted just by the thickness of his cassock as the Hospitallers required a bare minimum of two generations of nobility, maternal as well as paternal, for knighthood. While no depiction of the second son has come down to us, the portrait at left is of his elder brother Pierre-Cardin le Bret and his brother's son, in succession Lords of Flacourt, and may reflect a family resemblance. As le Chevalier de Flacourt the second son then made the two war-galley caravans required of all Hospitallers in 1663 and 1664 under Count Adam of Bratislava, cruising our Aegean crossroads to disrupt Ottoman sea lanes between Candia (Crete), Cyprus, and Constantinople. Flacourt next appears in history having returned to France, and with a commission in the king's naval army assigned as lieutenant to Francois de Vendome, Duc de Beaufort. Beaufort was the illegitimate grandson of French King Henry IV and his mistress Gabrielle d'Estrées, and thereby became cousin to Louis XIV and presumptive threat to the King's divine right by virtue of his own divine right. As aide, le Chevalier de Flacourt accompanied Beaufort at the head of 17 sailing men-of-war and sundry other vessels with 6,000 troops embarked to relief of the Ottoman siege of Candia, now Iraklion, Crete. Shortly after arrival in June 1669 Beaufort went missing amid rumors of a disaffected staff, his body never found. One month later Louis XIV's Secretary of State for War, the Marquis de Louvois, sent a letter to Bénigne Dauvergne de Saint-Mars, governor of the prison of Pignerol. In his letter, Louvois informed Saint-Mars that a prisoner was due to arrive within the month, and Saint-Mars was instructed to prepare a cell with multiple doors, one closing upon the other, to prevent observation by anyone on the outside. Are you catching the drift? When the prisoner arrived he wore an iron mask and was never again seen without it by anyone other than Saint-Mars through his 1703 death in Paris's Bastille and cremation. These are the facts underpinning Alexandre Dumas' The Man in the Iron Mask also available from your favorite book store. Shortly afterward Flacourt was promoted in the space of twelve months from lieutenant to commander and then to captain in command of Galant (46 guns). A ship of the line, Galant was assigned to the fleet commanded by Jean d'Estrees, Plan de la baie de Matance... - 1a nephew of Henry IV's mistress presumed to be curious about the disappearance of his own nephew. Flacourt served under Estrees for the next eight years, and was with the latter at 1672's Battle of Solebay and, the following year, at the Battles of Schooneveld and Texel, each against the Dutch. Then in command of Hercule (56) Flacourt also accompanied Estrees to the West Indies in 1677 for further combat with the Dutch and once more in 1679 when he prepared the rendering at right of Cuba's Matanzas Bay now in possession of the Bibliotheque Nationale de France. Jean d'Estrees retired from public life upon completion of the 1679 expedition and remained loyal to the crown until his death. During the interim between the two West Indies deployments and following the end of the Franco-Dutch War, Flacourt angered Jean Baptiste-Colbert, Minister of Marine, by refusing to report to his new command lying at Rochefort, a much smaller vessel than Hercule reflecting peacetime lay-up of most ships of the line. Colbert suggested Flacourt had foresaken his Hospitaller vows of chastity and abstention and had succumbed to the pleasures of the court. Colbert dismissed him. One day later Flacourt was given a larger command by the king himself, reinforcing a perception that Flacourt had long enjoyed the favor of an indebted king. It was nevertheless the period following the second West Indies excursion, the years of peace from 1680-1684, that le Chevalier Flacourt again appeared in the Aegean with his squadron of Maltese corsairs, flying the Portuguese flag because France was at peace with the Ottoman Empire. Fooling almost no one Flacourt's squadron famously joined the Hospitaller galley squadron commanded by Antoine Martin Colbert, third son of the minister, in entering the Candian port of Ierepetra. They did so to seize and did seize two Ottoman ships lying under the guns of the formerly-Venetian fortress commanding the port, Venice having surrendered Candia to the Ottomans months after Beaufort's disappearance. During the engagement Flacourt's own frigate took thirty cannon balls in the hull alone, but remained afloat to fight another day. Summoned back to France shortly afterward Flacourt is reported to have been made part of a 1685 embassy to Siam, an embassy which might best be entitled Forbin and the King of Siam told on our web page for the Sun Odyssey 39i. Please take a look by clicking on the link. If a part of the embassy, Flacourt is not mentioned in extant accounts. In either event, he was again recalled to France at outbreak of the War of the League of Augsburg with France on one side and everyone else on the other, and in 1688 was promoted to chef d'escadre or rear admiral. Flying his flag from Triomphant (80) he served under Anne Hilarion de Tourville (a Marshall of France with his own history in the Aegean told here) and distinguished himself at 1690's Battle of Beachy Head, an overwhelming French victory against a combined English and Dutch fleet. Returning to the Mediterranean in 1691 with thirty ships under his command, le Chevalier de Flacourt put the Spanish fleet to flight, taking Nuestra Senora de Atocha (58 guns) in the process. This most mysterious warrior and confidant of the king, however, succumbed to an unidentified injury or illness in August of 1692, not yet fifty years of age. Louis XIV, the Sun King, would remain on the French throne for another twenty-three years secure in his god-given right to rule. Superb Sun Odyssey yachts charter-sailing the Greek and Turkish Aegean. Contact Blue Cruise Yacht Charters today at blcryacht@aol.com